BYE BYE TURKEY

Last Thanksgiving we went to the supermarket and an employee told us the grocery had prepared itself with 10,000 turkeys ready for sale. This was at one store in the little port town in South Carolina we called home.

Supposedly there are over 38,000 grocery stores in the U.S. If 10,000 were sold at each store, that would make 380 million turkeys sacrificed for our one day tradition and holiday.

A farmer we know who raises livestock in a natural environment, makes his own organic feed and promotes educating the public on meat, told us most commercial livestock farms kill so many animals a day, they can’t let the meat hang and experience fermentation because they don’t have the room. Instead, they freeze and ship the meat off right after slaughter. It’s very different eating meat when you find out this sort of thing.

How many turkeys sold for Thanksgiving?

We grew up eating meat, but over time we have learned we don’t want to eat animals. We are on a mission to one day eat completely vegetarian and keep our PH levels at a healthy balance. As Max Gerson proved, no disease can exist in the body if it is alkaline.

It’s not an overnight thing, but already we only eat meat once a week, if at all. We’ve become educated about the difference between live and dead food. We realized food and meat being mass produced is unhealthy and eating whole foods, with little to no processing, is better for our bodies and the environment. We’ve had so much fun going to local farms and markets, cooking together and building a closer relationship with our food.

It seems as though more and more people are waking up and realizing food is the natural cure-all. We have met a bunch of people who, rather than eating an animal on holidays, prepare incredible vegetarian dishes. They give thanks without an animal having to be killed and instead of eating dead food, they feed their bodies with the living sustenance it deserves.

We can totally relate to anyone who has grown up doing the traditional thing and continues to do so. We have all been brought up with traditions – some we carry on and others we do not. The two of us have had Thanksgiving meals with turkey as the main dish for 30+ years. This Thanksgiving though, we decided against cooking a turkey and enjoyed a meat-free holiday instead. It felt more joyful and we were still as full as could be. We didn’t need a turkey to give thanks, or to have a wonderful time and eat gloriously. It felt better to praise life instead of take a life and for that, we are thankful.