TIME CHANGES

by | Inspiration, The Lills

According to Wikipedia and some recent articles we dove into, standard time as we know it was put in place by the U.S. and Canadian railways just back in 1883. Standard time was written into law in 1918. Before all of this occurred, local towns each followed their own clock, which could vary slightly or greatly just one town over.

The Lills Inspiration | Standard Time

We also heard some interesting information regarding sleep patterns. It turns out, the whole eight hours of sleep a night is a modern idea. Supposedly, humans in the 18th century used to go to sleep and wake up in the middle of the night, get some things done or mingle and go back to sleep a few hours later. A Virginia Tech historian wrote a whole book on it.

The digital clock on any phone, computer and most technological devices is outputted from an atomic clock, used to measure seconds and record time. We read there are over 400 atomic clocks contributing to the International Atomic Time, used to determine local time globally and the Coordinated Universal Time. These clocks are also used to help calculate satellite positions.

We also read the definition of a cesium second has changed 13 times and was most recently changed in 1967 by the International Committee of Weights and Measure. Supposedly they helped standardize timekeeping for civilians. Their official definition is “The second is the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium-133 atom.” Read more about it here.

In our opinion, time changes depending on where you are and what you’re doing. If you’re in a city, time may fly by and if you’re in the country or on an island, time may feel like it passes slower. By doing less in a day, but concentrating more fully on the tasks at hand, we have created our own little routine that works for us. By having made very few plans on this adventure, we haven’t kept up with what time it is and we have even experienced losing track of what day it is. There is a web of key moments, encounters, emotions, gifts and signs that steered us from one meant-to-be moment and location to the other. If we had taken one different turn on any given day, we would be on a completely different path.

We recommend anyone wanting to change time to take a weekend trip with no phone, no media and no distractions. Surround yourself in nature. Block out everything and let your senses go wild. Listen to your body. If you are tired, keep sleeping. If you are hungry, eat. Whatever you do, don’t look at your phone or watch. Set no alarms. Jump in a lake or an ocean, take a hike and take in the views, fall asleep exhausted from a different kind of tired and listen to the sound of real life all around you. When you wake up the next day, repeat the process and forget what time they say it is. If you have to go back to the real world, you will do so more aware. If you don’t have to go back, maybe you can come up with your own sense of time and how you use it.